Surrender ReasonSurrender Sub-ReasonSolution TitleInquiry originSolution DetailsLast Modified DateNum Related Cases
Behavior DogCrate trainingBehavior Dog Crate Training PhonePhoneThank you for contacting us. Our mission is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. It sounds like the behavior concern you describe could be addressed by crate training your dog, a relatively simple training process that helps dogs feel more secure when left alone and prevents chewing, having accidents inside, and other unwanted behavior. We also offer a training class for dogs who are anxious or bored when home alone. May I send you some information on training options?3/3/20140
Behavior DogCrate trainingBehavior Dog Crate Training EmailEmailThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. Have you tried crate training for [ behavior concern ]? Crate trainingis relatively easy and is a great way to help dogs feel secure when left alone and to prevent chewing, having accidents inside, and other unwanted behavior. I have attached some information that very clearly and simply explains how the crate training process works. Would you be willing to give it a try? You may find this is all that is needed to correct the [ behavior concern ], leading to a happier dog and human family! If you need additional help with your dog’s home alone behavior, we also offer a training class called Fido Home Alone for dogs who are bored or stressed when their families aren’t home. You can find more information on that class here: http://sfspca.org/programs-services/dog-training/classes/fido-home-alone I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.5/8/20150
Behavior DogHouse trainingBehavior Dog Housetraining EmailEmailThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes.   I think that we can help with your house training concerns. I know it can be very frustrating when your dog is having accidents inside the house. The good news is that this problem is very correctible with a little time, patience, and lots of treats and praise!   I have attached a document that gives a clear, step-by-step explanation of the process of house training your dog. If your dog was previously house trained but has suddenly begun having accidents indoors, we recommend seeing your veterinarian as there may be a medical cause for the accidents. If you don’t have a regular veterinarian, you may call the San Francisco SPCA Veterinary Hospital for an appointment at 415-554-3030. I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.  6/10/20150
Behavior DogHouse trainingBehavior Dog Housetraining PhonePhone    Thank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes.   I know it can be very frustrating when your dog is having accidents inside the house. The good news is that this problem is very correctible with a little time, patience, and lots of treats and praise!   I would be happy to email you document that gives a clear, step-by-step explanation of the process of house training your dog. If your dog was previously house trained but has suddenly begun having accidents indoors, we recommend seeing your veterinarian as there may be a medical cause for the accidents.   [Document: Dog Behavior_House-soiling] [Document: Dog Behavior_House-Training Adult Dog] [Document: Dog Behavior_House-training Puppy]3/4/201415
Behavior DogAggression towards peopleBehavior Dog Aggression Towards People PhonePhoneThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. It can certainly be alarming when a dog displays aggressive behavior towards humans. Fortunately, we have training and behaviorist resources available which may be able to help. May I send you more information on aggressive behavior and some training and veterinary behaviorist referrals?    * Aggressive behavior is sometimes linked to illness, injury, or other medical issues. Whenever a pet is displaying aggressive behavior, and particularly when the behavior represents a sudden change in the pet’s usual personality, we recommend seeing your veterinarian at the earliest opportunity. * You may also wish to consult a professional dog trainer who specializes in aggression issues. You should be aware that there are many agencies with many different standards for certifying dog trainers, so be sure to choose a seasoned trainer who practices positive, reward-based training, and one who has provable experience with aggressive behavior. You can find a list of the San Francisco SPCA’s recommended trainers here: http://www.sfspca.org/resources/library/for-dog-owners/dog-trainers-walkers   * If the behavior is severe or has caused (or you fear it will cause) injury to other animals or humans, we recommend an appointment with our veterinary behaviorist, Dr. Jeannine Berger. As a veterinarian, she can address all medical and behavioral concerns that may be contributing to this behavior.3/3/201451
Behavior DogHandling sensitivitiesBehavior Dog Aggression Towards People EmailEmailThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. It can certainly be alarming when a dog displays aggressive behavior towards humans. Fortunately, we have training and behaviorist resources available which may be able to help.   To begin with, I have attached a document called “ Dog Behavior_Aggression toward People ” which discusses common causes of aggression as well as strategies for avoiding aggressive behavior while you are awaiting professional help from a trainer or behaviorist. Please read this document over as soon as you are able to help keep your pets and family safe. Aggressive behavior is sometimes linked to illness, injury, or other medical issues. Whenever a pet is displaying aggressive behavior, and particularly when the behavior represents a sudden change in the pet’s usual personality, we recommend seeing your veterinarian at the earliest opportunity. If you don’t have a veterinarian or would like to have your dog seen at the San Francisco SPCA hospital, please call us at 415-554-3030. You may also wish to consult a professional dog trainer who specializes in aggression issues. You should be aware that there are many agencies with many different standards for certifying dog trainers, so be sure to choose a seasoned trainer who practices positive, reward-based training, and one who has provable experience with aggressive behavior. You can find a list of the San Francisco SPCA’s recommended trainers here: http://www.sfspca.org/resources/library/for-dog-owners/dog-trainers-walkers   If the behavior is severe or has caused (or you fear it will cause) injury to other animals or humans, we recommend an appointment with our veterinary behaviorist, Dr. Jeannine Berger. As a veterinarian, she can address all medical and behavioral concerns that may be contributing to this behavior. You can find more information on her services here: http://sfspca.org/programs-services/behavior-training/behavior-consultations I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.5/8/20150
Behavior DogAggression towards animalsBehavior Dog Aggression Towards Animals PhonePhoneThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. It can certainly be alarming when a dog displays aggressive behavior towards other pets. Fortunately, we have training and behaviorist resources available which may be able to help. May I send you more information on aggressive behavior and some training and veterinary behaviorist referrals?     * Dog Behavior_Dog-Dog Aggression Off Leash discusses common causes of aggression as well as strategies for avoiding aggressive behavior while you are awaiting professional help from a trainer or behaviorist. Until you have consulted a professional, it would be wise to keep your dogs separated or under close supervision while together. I Dog_Separating Fighting Dogs in case a fight breaks out.   * Aggressive behavior is sometimes linked illness, injury, or other medical issues. Whenever a pet is displaying aggressive behavior, and particularly when the behavior represents a sudden change in the pet’s usual personality, we recommend seeing your veterinarian at the earliest opportunity.   * You may also wish to consult a professional dog trainer who specializes in aggression issues. You should be aware that there are many agencies with many different standards for certifying dog trainers, so be sure to choose a seasoned trainer who practices positive, reward-based training, and one who has provable experience with aggressive behavior. You can find a list of the San Francisco SPCA’s recommended trainers here: http://www.sfspca.org/resources/library/for-dog-owners/dog-trainers-walkers   * If the behavior is severe or has caused (or you fear it will cause) injury to other animals or humans, we recommend an appointment with our veterinary behaviorist, Dr. Jeannine Berger. As a veterinarian, she can address all medical and behavioral concerns that may be contributing to this behavior.3/3/201440
Behavior DogAggression towards animalsBehavior Dog Aggression Towards Animals EmailEmailThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. It can certainly be alarming when a dog displays aggressive behavior towards other pets. Fortunately, we have training and behaviorist resources available which may be able to help.   To begin with, I have attached a document called “ Dog Behavior_Dog-Dog Aggression Off Leash ” which discusses common causes of aggression as well as strategies for avoiding aggressive behavior while you are awaiting professional help from a trainer or behaviorist. Until you have consulted a professional, it would be wise to keep your dogs separated or under close supervision while together. I have also attached another document, “ Dog_Separating Fighting Dogs ”, for your reference in case a fight breaks out. Please read these documents over as soon as you are able to help keep your pets and family safe.   Aggressive behavior is sometimes linked illness, injury, or other medical issues. Whenever a pet is displaying aggressive behavior, and particularly when the behavior represents a sudden change in the pet’s usual personality, we recommend seeing your veterinarian at the earliest opportunity. If you don’t have a veterinarian or would like to have your dog seen at the San Francisco SPCA hospital, please call us at 415-554-3000.   You may also wish to consult a professional dog trainer who specializes in aggression issues. You should be aware that there are many agencies with many different standards for certifying dog trainers, so be sure to choose a seasoned trainer who practices positive, reward-based training, and one who has provable experience with aggressive behavior. You can find a list of the San Francisco SPCA’s recommended trainers here: http://www.sfspca.org/resources/library/for-dog-owners/dog-trainers-walkers   If the behavior is severe or has caused (or you fear it will cause) injury to other animals or humans, we recommend an appointment with our veterinary behaviorist, Dr. Jeannine Berger. As a veterinarian, she can address all medical and behavioral concerns that may be contributing to this behavior. You can find more information on her services here: http://sfspca.org/programs-services/behavior-training/behavior-consultations I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.5/8/20159
Behavior DogLeash frustrationsBehavior Dog Leash Frustrations EmailEmailThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. Leash reactivity – acting out in frustration when encountering other dogs while leashed – is a very common dog behavior concern and one for which we have many resources available. I have attached some basic information on leash reactivity that explains and discusses training strategies for dogs who are reactive when leashed. Please see the attached document “Aggression On Leash."   We offer a training class called “Reactive Rover” designed to manage or correct leash reactivity. You can find more information on that class here: http://www.sfspca.org/programs-services/dog-training/classes/reactive-rover-1 .   If you prefer to work one-on-one with a private trainer, please see our referral list here: http://www.sfspca.org/resources/library/for-dog-owners/dog-trainers-walkers .   If you need more help than is contained in the attached reading material or feel that a training class is not for you, you may wish to book an appointment with our staff veterinary behaviorist, Dr. Jeannine Berger. As a veterinarian, she can address all medical and behavioral concerns that may be contributing to this behavior. You can find more information on her services here: http://sfspca.org/programs-services/behavior-training/behavior-consultations   I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.  6/10/20150
Behavior DogLeash frustrationsBehavior Dog Leash Frustrations PhonePhoneThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. Leash reactivity – acting out in frustration when encountering other dogs while leashed – is a very common dog behavior concern and one for which we have many resources available. May I send that information to you? It contains basic information on leash reactivity that explains and discusses training strategies for dogs who are reactive when leashed. “Document: Aggression On Leash."   * We offer a training class called “Reactive Rover” designed to manage or correct leash reactivity. You can find more information on that class here: http://www.sfspca.org/programs-services/dog-training/classes/reactive-rover-1 .      * If you prefer to work one-on-one with a private trainer, please see our referral list here: http://www.sfspca.org/resources/library/for-dog-owners/dog-trainers-walkers .   * If you need more help than is contained in the attached reading material or feel that a training class is not for you, you may wish to book an appointment with our staff veterinary behaviorist, Dr. Jeannine Berger. As a veterinarian, she can address all medical and behavioral concerns that may be contributing to this behavior. You can find more information on her services here: http://sfspca.org/programs-services/behavior-training/behavior-consultations    3/4/20142
Behavior DogSeparation-related issuesBehavior Dog Seperation Related Issues EmailEmailThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. Many dogs become anxious or bored when left alone. We have several resources available to help determine the cause of and manage your dog’s home alone behavior.   I have attached some basic information on separation-related problems, independence training, and crate training that may be useful to you in helping your dog feel more comfortable when home alone. We also offer a training class called Fido Home Alone which teaches strategies for working with a dog who is bored or stressed when alone. You can find more information on that class here: http://sfspca.org/programs-services/dog-training/classes/fido-home-alone . If you need more help than is contained in the attached reading material or feel that a training class is not for you, you may wish to book an appointment with our staff veterinary behaviorist, Dr. Jeannine Berger. As a veterinarian, she can address all medical and behavioral concerns that may be contributing to this behavior. You can find more information on her services here: http://sfspca.org/programs-services/behavior-training/behavior-consultations   I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.5/8/20157
Behavior DogSeparation-related issuesBehavior Dog Seperation Related Issues PhonePhoneThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. Many dogs become anxious or bored when left alone. We have several resources available to help determine the cause of and manage your dog’s home alone behavior.   May I send some helpful information to you? It is basic information on separation-related problems, independence training, and crate training that may be useful to you in helping your dog feel more comfortable when home alone.   * We also offer a training class called Fido Home Alone which teaches strategies for working with a dog who is bored or stressed when alone. You can find more information on that class here: http://sfspca.org/programs-services/dog-training/classes/fido-home-alone . * If you need more help than is contained in the attached reading material or feel that a training class is not for you, you may wish to book an appointment with our staff veterinary behaviorist, Dr. Jeannine Berger. As a veterinarian, she can address all medical and behavioral concerns that may be contributing to this behavior. You can find more information on her services here: http://sfspca.org/programs-services/behavior-training/behavior-consultations  3/4/201425
Behavior DogExcessive barkingBehavior Dog Excessive Barking EmailEmailThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. Barking is a normal form of dog communication which, for a variety of reasons, can grow excessive. Fortunately, once a trigger is identified, there are many management and training options available to decrease or correct the behavior.   I have attached some basic information on excessive barking that discusses some of the most common reasons for barking as well as management and training strategies for each trigger. Please see the attached document, “Dog: Barking."   We offer several training classes that may address the causes of your dog’s barking. For example, if your dog’s barking is triggered by other dogs while being walked on a leash, our “Reactive Rover” class may be helpful to you. You can find more information about this class, as well as all dog training classes offered, here: http://sfspca.org/programs-services/dog-training . If you prefer to work one-on-one with a private trainer, please see our referral list here: http://www.sfspca.org/resources/library/for-dog-owners/dog-trainers-walkers. If you need more help than is contained in the attached reading material or feel that a training class is not for you, you may wish to book an appointment with our staff veterinary behaviorist, Dr. Jeannine Berger. As a veterinarian, she can address all medical and behavioral concerns that may be contributing to this behavior. You can find more information on her services here: http://sfspca.org/programs-services/behavior-training/behavior-consultations   I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.5/8/20152
Behavior DogExcessive barkingBehavior Dog Excessive Barking PhonePhoneThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. Barking is a normal form of dog communication which, for many reasons, can grow excessive. Fortunately, once a trigger is identified, there are many management and training options available to decrease or correct the behavior. May I send you more information on this subject and the training resources available?   Attachment: “Dog: Barking."   * We also  offer several training classes that may address the causes of your dog’s barking. For example, if your dog’s barking is triggered by other dogs while being walked on a leash, our “Reactive Rover” class may be helpful to you. You can find more information about this class, as well as all dog training classes offered, here: http://sfspca.org/programs-services/dog-training .   * If you need more help than is contained in the attached reading material or feel that a training class is not for you, you may wish to book an appointment with our staff veterinary behaviorist, Dr. Jeannine Berger. As a veterinarian, she can address all medical and behavioral concerns that may be contributing to this behavior. You can find more information on her services here: http://sfspca.org/programs-services/behavior-training/behavior-consultations3/3/20147
Behavior DogShy / fearfulShy / Fearful Dog EmailEmailThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. There are many reasons a dog may be shy or fearful, and we have many resources available to help build trust and confidence in your dog. We offer a couple of training classes designed for shy or fearful dogs. The first, “Bravery Class for Shy Dogs”, focuses on bonding and stress relief techniques for shy dogs, to build confidence and provide mental and physical stimulation. More information on the bravery class can be found here: http://sfspca.org/programs-services/dog-training/classes/shy-dog . “Focus: Attention, Not Tension”, works on techniques for redirecting your dog’s focus to you when in a stress-inducing situation. You can find more information on the focus class here: http://www.sfspca.org/programs-services/dog-training/classes/focus. I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.6/10/20150
Behavior DogResource guardingBehavior Dog Resource Guarding emailEmailThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. Many dogs experience resource, food, or location guarding. We have several resources available to help manage this behavior I have attached some basic information on guarding behavior, as a PDF document.   If you need more help than is contained in the attached reading material or feel that a training class is not for you, you may wish to book an appointment with our staff veterinary behaviorist, Dr. Jeannine Berger. As a veterinarian, she can address all medical and behavioral concerns that may be contributing to this behavior. You can find more information on her services here: http://sfspca.org/programs-services/behavior-training/behavior-consultations I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.6/11/20150
Behavior CatPlay aggressionBehavior Cat Play Aggression EmailEmailThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. Biting or scratching during play is not unusual for cats, and is often a result of not having learned bite and scratch inhibition early in life from littermates. I have attached a document with more information on play aggression to help you lessen the intensity of the behavior and to avoid future bites and scratches. I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.6/10/20151
Behavior CatPlay aggressionBehavior Cat Play Aggression PhonePhoneThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. Biting or scratching during play is not unusual for cats, and is often a result of not having learned bite and scratch inhibition early in life from littermates. I would be happy to send some information on working with this natural behavior in your cat to lessen the intensity and avoid future bites and scratches.3/3/201426
Behavior CatOver-stimulationBehavior Cat Over-stimulation EmailEmailThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. It is not unusual for a cat to bite or scratch after extended (or sometimes not so extended) handling. Fortunately, I have information available which may help you.   All cats have a threshold for how much handling they can tolerate. The threshold can also change depending on the cat’s environment, health, and activity level.   Most cats give warning signals when approaching this threshold, but we humans often miss those, at which point the cat escalates to biting or scratching. This is called overstimulation. I have attached some information on understanding your cat’s handling threshold and avoiding bites and scratches for you to review at your convenience. I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.6/15/20152
Behavior CatOver-stimulationBehavior Cat Over-stimulation PhonePhoneThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. It is not unusual for a cat to bite or scratch after extended (or sometimes not so extended) handling. All cats have a threshold for how much handling they can tolerate. The threshold can also change depending on the cat’s environment, health, and activity level.   Most cats give warning signals when approaching this threshold, but we humans often miss those, at which point the cat escalates to biting or scratching. This is called overstimulation. May I send you some information on understanding your cat’s handling threshold and avoiding bites and scratches?3/3/201413
Behavior CatInappropriate urinationBehavior Cat Inappropriate Urination EmailEmailThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. It is not unusual for a cat to eliminate outside of the litter box for medical reasons, stress, or because of a problem (which may be imperceptible to humans) with the litter box setup or location. The good news is that, whether medical or environmental, this problem is usually correctable.   I have attached some basic information on inappropriate elimination that discusses common causes and solutions for this problem. Please note that the first step for all cases of inappropriate elimination is to take your cat to a veterinarian to make sure that the problem is not medical in nature. If you need more help than is contained in the attached reading material, you may wish to book an appointment with our staff veterinary behaviorist, Dr. Jeannine Berger. As a veterinarian, she can address all medical and behavioral concerns that may be contributing to this behavior. You can find more information on her services here: http://sfspca.org/programs-services/behavior-training/behavior-consultations   Having a private behavior specialist come to your home also tends to be very helpful considering that many inappropriate elimination issues are environmental in nature.   I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.6/15/20157
Behavior CatInappropriate urinationBehavior Cat Inappropriate Urination PhonePhoneThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. It is not unusual for a cat to eliminate outside of the litter box for medical reasons, stress, or because of a problem (which may be imperceptible to humans) with the litter box setup or location. May I send you more information on determining the cause of the inappropriate elimination and correcting it?     The first step for all cases of inappropriate elimination is to take your cat to a veterinarian to make sure that the problem is not medical in nature. If you need more help than is contained in the attached reading material, you may wish to book an appointment with our staff veterinary behaviorist, Dr. Jeannine Berger. As a veterinarian, she can address all medical and behavioral concerns that may be contributing to this behavior.3/3/201438
Behavior CatExcessive meowingBehavior Cat Excessive Meowing EmailEmailThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. There are several reasons a cat may meow excessively, both medical and behavioral, and we have resources available to help you whatever the cause may be.   I have attached some basic information on excessive meowing that explains some common causes for the behavior as well as ways of correcting it. Please see the attached document “Cat_Excessive Meowing”.   For a cat who is normally not very vocal, or in an older cat, the onset excessive meowing it can be often indicative of an underlying medical issue. Because some of these issues can be quite serious or cause discomfort, we recommend seeing a veterinarian to rule out medical causes. If you don’t have a veterinarian or would like to have your cat seen at the San Francisco SPCA hospital, please call us at 415-554-3000. If you need more help than is contained in the attached reading material, you may wish to book an appointment with our staff veterinary behaviorist, Dr. Jeannine Berger. As a veterinarian, she can address all medical and behavioral concerns that may be contributing to this behavior. You can find more information on her services here: http://sfspca.org/programs-services/behavior-training/behavior-consultations   I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.6/10/20151
Behavior CatExcessive meowingBehavior Cat Excessive Meowing PhonePhoneThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. There are several reasons a cat may meow excessively, both medical and behavioral, and we have resources available to help you whatever the cause may be. May I send you some information on those resources? [Document: Cat_Excessive Meowing]     * For a cat who is normally not very vocal, or in an older cat, the onset excessive meowing it can be often indicative of an underlying medical issue. Because some of these issues can be quite serious or cause discomfort, we recommend seeing a veterinarian to rule out medical causes. * If you need more help than is contained in the attached reading material, you may wish to book an appointment with our staff veterinary behaviorist, Dr. Jeannine Berger. As a veterinarian, she can address all medical and behavioral concerns that may be contributing to this behavior.  3/3/20144
Behavior CatShy / fearfulBehavior Cat Shy / Fearful EmailEmailThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. Shy or fearful behavior is common in cats for a variety of reasons, and we have many resources available to help you improve your cat’s trust and confidence.   I have attached some basic information on fearful behavior as well as some information on over-the-counter stress relief aids that may be helpful to you. Please see the attached documents, “Cat_Adopting a Fearful Cat” and “Cat_Anxiety Chemical Relievers”.   For a cat who is normally confident and outgoing, sudden onset of fearful behavior is sometimes indicative of an underlying medical issue. Because some of these issues can be quite serious or cause discomfort, we recommend seeing a veterinarian to rule out medical causes if this is the case with your cat. If you don’t have a veterinarian or would like to have your cat seen at the San Francisco SPCA hospital, please call us at 415-554-3000. If your cat’s fearfulness is severe or you need more help than the suggestions contained in the reading material, you may wish to book an appointment with our staff veterinary behaviorist, Dr. Jeannine Berger. As a veterinarian, she can address all medical and behavioral concerns that may be contributing to this behavior. You can find more information on her services here: http://sfspca.org/programs-services/behavior-training/behavior-consultations   I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.5/8/20151
Behavior CatShy / fearfulBehavior Cat Shy / Fearful PhonePhoneThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. Shy or fearful behavior is common in cats for a variety of reasons, and we have many resources available to help you improve your cat’s trust and confidence. May I send you some information on those resources?       “Cat_Adopting a Fearful Cat” and “Cat_Anxiety Chemical Relievers”.   * For a cat who is normally confident and outgoing, sudden onset of fearful behavior is sometimes indicative of an underlying medical issue. Because some of these issues can be quite serious or cause discomfort, we recommend seeing a veterinarian to rule out medical causes if this is the case with your cat.     * If your cat’s fearfulness is severe or you need more help than the suggestions contained in the reading material, you may wish to book an appointment with our staff veterinary behaviorist, Dr. Jeannine Berger. As a veterinarian, she can address all medical and behavioral concerns that may be contributing to this behavior.3/3/20145
Behavior CatInappropriate defecationInappropriate Defication EmailEmailThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. It is not unusual for a cat to eliminate outside of the litter box for medical reasons, due to stress, or because of a problem (which may be imperceptible to humans) with the litter box setup or location – it is important to know that this is a cat’s innate, instinctive response to certain situations and is never something the cat does with the intent of upsetting the guardian or destroying household items. The good news is that, whether medical or environmental, this problem is usually correctible. I have attached some basic information on inappropriate elimination that discusses common causes and solutions for this problem. Please note that the first step for all cases of inappropriate elimination is to take your cat to a veterinarian to make sure that the problem is not medical in nature. If you need more help than is contained in the attached reading material, you may wish to book an appointment with our staff veterinary behaviorist, Dr. Jeannine Berger. As a veterinarian, she can address all medical and behavioral concerns that may be contributing to this behavior. You can find more information on her services here: http://sfspca.org/programs-services/behavior-training/behavior-consultations Having a private behavior specialist come to your home also tends to be very helpful considering that many inappropriate elimination issues are environmental in nature. You can find a list of local behavior specialist options here: http://www.yelp.com/search?find_desc=cat+behavior&find_loc=San+Francisco%2C+CA&ns=1 I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.5/11/20150
Life ChangesMoving / landlord restrictionsLife Changes Moving / landlord restrictions EmailEmailThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. A lot of people face the same situation you are in. Since surrendering to a shelter should be considered the last resort, have you looked into renting at places that allow pets in the building? Have you asked others in the family if they could temporarily "foster" your pet while you find a place that allows pets? I’ve attached a document that gives detailed tips for finding a new home for your pet with friends, family, or members of your community. Placing your pet directly in a new home spares him or her the stress of living in an animal shelter, and leaves a lifesaving space for other pets in need. I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information. [Document: Finding a new home for your pet]5/11/20150
Life ChangesMoving / landlord restrictionsLife Changes Moving / landlord restrictions PhonePhoneThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. There are a lot of people out there running in to the same problems when moving. May I send you some information with tips for finding a new home for your pet with friends, family, or members of your community?   Placing your pet directly in a new home spares him or her the stress of living in an animal shelter, and leaves a lifesaving space for other pets in need. [Document: Finding a new home for your pet]2/10/20140
Life ChangesOwner illnessLife Changes Owner Illness EmailEmailThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. I’m so sorry to hear of your illness and hope we can help you find a solution for your pet’s care. Unable to keep due to short term illness : Our veterinary hospital offers short-term boarding up to two weeks. Do you think boarding your pet with us would be helpful? You can find more information on our boarding services here: http://sfspca.org/veterinary-hospital/boarding-services If that isn’t possible for you, are you able to try finding a new home for your pet with friends, family, or members of your community?   Placing your pet directly in a new home spares him or her the stress of living in an animal shelter, and leaves a lifesaving space for other pets in need. Please see the attached document for tips on placing your pet directly in a new home.   Unable to keep due to debilitating illness: PAWS (Pets Are Wonderful Support) offers financial assistance to pet guardians who are seniors or who are living with serious illness or disability. Their website, http://www.pawssf.org , contains more information on eligibility if you would like to explore that option. If that isn’t possible for you, are you able to try finding a new home for your pet with friends, family, or members of your community?   Placing your pet directly in a new home spares him or her the stress of living in an animal shelter, and leaves a lifesaving space for other pets in need. Please see the attached document for tips on placing your pet directly in a new home. If you are truly unable to keep your pet, we would be happy to discuss the surrender process with you. I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.5/8/20157
Life ChangesOwner illnessLife Changes Owner Illness PhonePhoneThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. I’m so sorry to hear of your illness and hope we can help you find a solution for your pet’s care. Our veterinary hospital offers short-term boarding up to two weeks. Do you think boarding your pet with us would be helpful? If not, may I send you some information on finding a new home for your pet with friends, family, or members of your community?   Placing your pet directly in a new home spares him or her the stress of living in an animal shelter, and leaves a lifesaving space for other pets in need. If you are truly unable to keep your pet, we would be happy to discuss the surrender process with you.1/8/201442
Life ChangesCan't afford medicalLife Changes Can't afford medical EmailEmailThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. We hope that one of the options below will help you get treatment for and keep your pet. Our veterinary hospital offers financial assistance to qualifying San Francisco residents. Please see our Financing Options page for more information. If you don’t qualify for the San Francisco SPCA’s financial assistance programs, you can find information on other assistance options here . I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.6/10/20156
Life ChangesCan't afford medicalLife Changes Can't afford medical PhonePhoneThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. We have information on financial assistance offered by the San Francisco SPCA and other groups that may help you get treatment for your pet and keep him/her with you. Do you have time for me to share some information on those options with you?2/10/201431
Life ChangesAllergiesOther Allergies EmailEmailThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. Have you consulted your doctor or pharmacist for advice on your allergies? Many people with allergies live successfully with pets thanks to allergy medication. If that isn’t possible for you, would you consider finding a new home for your pet with friends, family, or members of your community?  Placing your pet directly in a new home spares him or her the stress of living in an animal shelter, and leaves a lifesaving space for other pets in need. Please see the attached document for tips on placing your pet directly in a new home. I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.   [Document Attachment: Finding a new home for your pet]6/10/20156
Life ChangesOwner deathLife changes Owner death EmailEmailThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. I am so sorry to hear of the passing of your loved one and am happy to discuss options for his/her pets. Would you consider finding a new home for the pet with friends, family, or members of your community?  Placing a pet directly in a new home spares him or her the stress of living in an animal shelter, and leaves a lifesaving space for other pets in need. Please see the attached document for tips on placing the pet directly in a new home.   If finding a new home for the pet isn’t possible, I would be happy to discuss the surrender process with you. I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.   [Document: Finding a new home for your pet]1/10/20141
Life ChangesOwner deathLife changes Owner death PhonePhoneThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. I am so sorry to hear of the passing of your loved one and am happy to discuss options for his/her pets. Would you like information on finding a new home for your pet with friends, family, or members of your community?  Placing your pet directly in a new home spares him or her the stress of living in an animal shelter, and leaves a lifesaving space for other pets in need. If that isn’t possible, I would be happy to discuss the surrender process with you.1/10/201415
Life ChangesLong-term boarding needsLife Changes Long-term boarding needs EmailEmailThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. I am very sorry to hear that you are in such difficult circumstances which have left your future with your pet uncertain. Unfortunately, our foster program is only for kittens and puppies too young to be adopted and the occasional shelter animal who is recovering from illness or injury. For moving/general life issues: Your best bet will probably be to find a facility where you can board your pet. Most boarding facilities are only set up for short-term boarding periods of a few weeks, but it would be worth calling around and checking on prices and policies. A good place to start is Yelp:  http://www.yelp.com/search?find_desc=pet+boarding&find_loc=San+Francisco%2C+CA&ns=1 The San Francisco SPCA offers boarding services limited to two weeks per stay. You can find more information on that service here: http://sfspca.org/veterinary-hospital/boarding-services   For domestic violence: The Humane Society of the United States partners with some California shelters for their Safe Haven program. In San Francisco, that shelter is San Francisco Animal Care and control at 415-554-6364. For a list of all California Safe Haven shelters, please see http://www.humanesociety.org/issues/abuse_neglect/tips/safe_havens_directory.html#   For active duty military/homeless vets: There are several organizations for active duty and veteran service people which may be able to help you find temporary care for your pets. Please contact Guardian Angels for Soldiers’ Pets , Dogs on Deployment , or The Military Pets FOSTER Project for more information on assistance that may be available to you. I’m sorry that we are unable to offer the foster service you requested, but I am hopeful that this information will be helpful to you. Please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further support or information.5/11/20150
Life ChangesLong-term boarding needsLife Changes Long-term boarding needs PhonePhoneThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. I am very sorry to hear that you are in such difficult circumstances which have left your future with your pet uncertain. Unfortunately, our foster program is only for kittens and puppies too young to be adopted and the occasional shelter animal who is recovering from illness or injury. Your best bet will probably be to find a facility where you can board your pet. Most boarding facilities are only set up for short-term boarding periods of a few weeks, but it would be worth calling around and checking on prices and policies. A good place to start is Yelp.  The San Francisco SPCA offers boarding services limited to two weeks per stay. There are some organizations that may be able to help individuals escaping domestic violence or past or present military service people. Would you like more information on any of those options?1/10/20140
Life ChangesDivorceLife Changes Divorce EmailEmailThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. Would you consider finding a new home for the pet with friends, family, or members of your community?  Placing a pet directly in a new home spares him or her the stress of living in an animal shelter, and leaves a lifesaving space for other pets in need. Please see the attached document for tips on placing the pet directly in a new home. If finding a new home for the pet isn’t possible, I would be happy to discuss the surrender process with you. I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information. [Document: Finding a new home for your pet]5/8/20153
Life ChangesDivorceLife Changes Divorce PhonePhoneThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes.  Would you consider finding a new home for the pet with friends, family, or members of your community?  Placing a pet directly in a new home spares him or her the stress of living in an animal shelter, and leaves a lifesaving space for other pets in need. Please see the attached document for tips on placing the pet directly in a new home. If finding a new home for the pet isn’t possible, I would be happy to discuss the surrender process with you.1/10/20149
Life ChangesForeclosureLife Changes Foreclosure PhonePhoneThank you for contacting us. Our mission is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. I am so sorry to hear that you are facing the loss of your home and your pet, and hope we can help you get your pet into a new home as quickly as possible. Would you consider finding a new home for the pet with friends, family, or members of your community?  Placing a pet directly in a new home spares him or her the stress of living in an animal shelter, and leaves a lifesaving space for other pets in need. Please see the attached document for tips on placing the pet directly in a new home. If finding a new home for the pet isn’t possible, I would be happy to discuss the surrender process with you.1/10/20140
Life ChangesCan't afford foodLife Changes Can't afford food EmailEmailThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. I have attached a list of assistance programs for pet food that may help you keep your pet. Would you like to contact some organizations on this list, and then contact us if you still need a surrender appointment? I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information. [Documents: Pet food assistance]5/8/20150
Life ChangesCan't afford foodLife Changes Can't afford food PhonePhoneThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. Would assistance with pet food allow you to keep your pet? I can send a list of pet food assistance options that may be helpful to you.1/10/20148
Life ChangesDog needs more attentionOther Dog Needs More Attention EmailEmailThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. Most people have to leave their pets at home while at work, and there are a number of solutions that enable busy guardians to keep their dogs happy and occupied during time alone.   I have attached some basic information on some easy ways of keeping your dog mentally and physically stimulated when you aren’t home. Please see the attached documents, “Dog_Independence Training” and “Dog_KONG Stuffing” for tips.   If your dog is displaying bored or anxious behavior when left alone, you may wish to see the attached documents “Dog Commands_Crate Training Adult Dog” and “Dog Behavior_Separation-Related Problems”. Our Fido Home Alone class is also an excellent resource for dogs who experience boredom or stress when alone: http://sfspca.org/programs-services/dog-training/classes/fido-home-alone . Dog walkers and doggy day care are fun getaways for your dog and allow you to come home to an exercised, relaxed dog rather than one who is full of pent-up energy. Please see our dog professional referral lists here: http://www.sfspca.org/resources/library/for-dog-owners/dog-trainers-walkers . If this is not in your budget, many people avoid these expenses by setting up a dog walking or pet sitting exchange with friends or neighbors. Consider asking your friends and neighbors or contacting your local community groups to see if such an exchange already exists in your area. You might also consider a pet sitting exchange website such as http://www.petstouch.com/petclub.asp .   I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.5/11/20152
Life ChangesNew babyNew babyEmailHi_____, Thank you for talking with me about ________. I hope that this information will help you find a home for her so that she never has to experience the stress of entering a shelter. Please let us know if you have any questions! Thank you, _____________ Re-homing tips Animals tend to deteriorate in a shelter environment making it more difficult to build a bond or connection with a potential guardian. Re-homing a pet straight from the home environment is ideal. After all, no one knows your pet like you do! Make sure the pet is up-to-date on their vaccinations. It’s a good idea to print their veterinary records and keep them handy so they can be given to the animal’s new pet parent. Take some good color photos. A potential adopter can begin to form a bond right away with your pet after seeing his or her picture. Focus on illustrating the animal’s most adorable qualities and their favorite activities. If your pet loves fetch, for example, take a picture of them happily chasing the ball. Provide detailed information. Write a paragraph or two about the pet. Explain why they need a new home, describe what kind of home would be best for them, and outline their likes and dislikes. Be sure to list your favorite things about them. Mention the most entertaining and endearing aspects of their personality. It might help to write from their perspective: “My name is B-O-D-H-I, not Bingo, but it’s similar in the fact that you will hit the “jackpot” if you adopt me!  Why might you ask?  Well I am a sweet, loving, affectionate, playful guy—and I will charm my way right into your heart and your home.  If you are active and like a dog friend to accompany you, then I am the one for you.  I prefer the company of grown-up two-legged creatures more than four-legged creatures, so I would do better at the beach than at the doggie park,  I graduated with honors from my training school—so come in and visit me and let me show you a few of my tricks…”   Spread the word: •              E-mail everyone you know and ask them to forward your message to their friends and family. •              Put up posters and fliers at pet stores, veterinary clinics, boarding facilities and pet grooming salons. Be sure to include your telephone number or e-mail address so that interested parties can easily reach you. •              Create a Facebook page for your pet. Place an ad on Craigslist or in a local newspaper. Include the best photo of the pet and a written description of them. When people see the ad and contact you, screen applicants carefully. One good way to screen applicants is to ask for phone numbers for their veterinarian, trainer, groomer, etc., who can let you know how well previous or existing pets were cared for. A good pet parent will understand that you are just trying to find the best possible home for your pet! •              Some rescues offer courtesy listings for pets on their websites and Facebook pages. Try contacting local rescues to find out if they offer this service. •              Try a rescue. Most rescues house pets in foster homes rather than in kennels, which tends to be far less stressful. Not all rescues are created equally, so do your research and make sure the rescue meets the standards of care you’d want for your pet. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.5/11/20151
HousingForeclosureLife Changes Foreclosure EmailEmailThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. I am so sorry to hear that you are facing the loss of your home and your pet, and hope we can help you get your pet into a new home as quickly as possible. Would you consider finding a new home for the pet with friends, family, or members of your community?  Placing a pet directly in a new home spares him or her the stress of living in an animal shelter, and leaves a lifesaving space for other pets in need. Please see the attached document for tips on placing the pet directly in a new home. If finding a new home for the pet isn’t possible, I would be happy to discuss the surrender process with you. I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information. [Document: Finding a new home for your pet]5/11/20151
HousingChanges to leaseChange to Lease EmailEmailI am sorry to hear you are facing a housing situation that jeopardizes keeping _____ . We understand that finding pet friendly housing can be fairly stressful. If you are in search of pet friendly housing, but need to place your pet somewhere temporary, we recommend asking around to family and friends to see if they can “foster” _____ until you find a place that will accept pets.     If you are unable to find pet friendly housing, the shelter should still be your very last resort.   The best alternative would be to find a new home for your pet on your own. Placing your pet directly in a new home spares him or her the stress of living in an animal shelter, and leaves a lifesaving space for other pets in need. Please find the tips on re-homing your pet below.   [Insert re-homing tips]   Another option is to surrender your pet to a rescue group. Rescues are preferred over shelters, because they often keep their pets in foster homes rather than kennels. A more familiar housing experience can cut down on stress and illness. You can even look into rescues that are breed specific or for senior pets. Please find a list of rescues below.   [Insert rescue list]   I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3030 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.5/8/20155
HousingBreed restrictionBreed Restriction EmailEmailI am sorry to hear you are facing a housing situation that jeopardizes keeping _____ . We understand that finding pet friendly housing can be fairly stressful. If you are in search of pet friendly housing, but need to place your pet somewhere temporary, we recommend asking around to family and friends to see if they can “foster” _____ until you find a place that will accept pets.     If you are unable to find pet friendly housing, the shelter should still be your very last resort.   The best alternative would be to find a new home for your pet on your own. Placing your pet directly in a new home spares him or her the stress of living in an animal shelter, and leaves a lifesaving space for other pets in need. Please find the tips on re-homing your pet below.   [Insert re-homing tips]   Another option is to surrender your pet to a rescue group. Rescues are preferred over shelters, because they often keep their pets in foster homes rather than kennels. A more familiar housing experience can cut down on stress and illness. You can even look into rescues that are breed specific or for senior pets. Please find a list of rescues below.   [Insert rescue list]   I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3030 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.5/4/20152
HousingForeclosureForeclosure PhonePhoneDear ________ ,   I am sorry to hear you are facing a housing situation that jeopardizes keeping _____ . We understand that finding pet friendly housing can be fairly stressful. If you are in search of pet friendly housing, but need to place your pet somewhere temporary, we recommend asking around to family and friends to see if they can “foster” _____ until you find a place that will accept pets.     If you are unable to find pet friendly housing, the shelter should still be your very last resort.   The best alternative would be to find a new home for your pet on your own. Placing your pet directly in a new home spares him or her the stress of living in an animal shelter, and leaves a lifesaving space for other pets in need. Please find the tips on re-homing your pet below.   [Insert re-homing tips]   Another option is to surrender your pet to a rescue group. Rescues are preferred over shelters, because they often keep their pets in foster homes rather than kennels. A more familiar housing experience can cut down on stress and illness. You can even look into rescues that are breed specific or for senior pets. Please find a list of rescues below.   [Insert rescue list]   I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3030 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.  6/16/20145
HousingMoving out of state or countryMoving out of State or Country EmailEmailMoving can be a very stressful experience for you and your pets, especially when it involves moving long distances with you furry companion. Luckily, there are resources for pet owners that need to relocate. One local pet transport company is Pet Express Animal Transport in Brisbane, http://pet-express.com/ .   You may want to contact them for guidance on safe pet travel and even help in the relocation process. You can also contact airlines directly for information on their services and policies for traveling with your pet. Pet travel does take some planning, so be sure to start the process early to give yourself time to prepare before your travel date.     If you are unable to move with your pet, the shelter should still be your very last resort.   The best alternative would be to find a new home for your pet on your own. Placing your pet directly in a new home spares him or her the stress of living in an animal shelter, and leaves a lifesaving space for other pets in need. Please find the tips on re-homing your pet below.   [Insert re-homing tips]   Another option is to surrender your pet to a rescue group. Rescues are preferred over shelters, because they often keep their pets in foster homes rather than kennels. A more familiar housing experience can cut down on stress and illness. You can even look into rescues that are breed-specific or for senior pets. Please find a list of rescues below.   [Insert rescue list]   I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.  5/8/20159
HousingMoving out of state or countryMoving out of state or country PhonePhoneDear _______ ,   Moving can be a very stressful experience for you and your pets, especially when it involves moving long distances with you furry companion. Luckily, there are resources for pet owners that need to relocate. One local pet transport company is Pet Express Animal Transport in Brisbane, http://pet-express.com/ .   You may want to contact them for guidance on safe pet travel and even help in the relocation process. You can also contact airlines directly for information on their services and policies for traveling with your pet. Pet travel does take some planning, so be sure to start the process early to give yourself time to prepare before your travel date.     If you are unable to move with your pet, the shelter should still be your very last resort.   The best alternative would be to find a new home for your pet on your own. Placing your pet directly in a new home spares him or her the stress of living in an animal shelter, and leaves a lifesaving space for other pets in need. Please find the tips on re-homing your pet below.   [Insert re-homing tips]   Another option is to surrender your pet to a rescue group. Rescues are preferred over shelters, because they often keep their pets in foster homes rather than kennels. A more familiar housing experience can cut down on stress and illness. You can even look into rescues that are breed-specific or for senior pets. Please find a list of rescues below.   [Insert rescue list]   I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.  6/16/201437
HousingBreed restrictionBreed Restriction PhonePhoneDear ________ ,   I am sorry to hear you are facing a housing situation that jeopardizes keeping _____ . We understand that finding pet friendly housing can be fairly stressful. If you are in search of pet friendly housing, but need to place your pet somewhere temporary, we recommend asking around to family and friends to see if they can “foster” _____ until you find a place that will accept pets.     If you are unable to find pet friendly housing, the shelter should still be your very last resort.   The best alternative would be to find a new home for your pet on your own. Placing your pet directly in a new home spares him or her the stress of living in an animal shelter, and leaves a lifesaving space for other pets in need. Please find the tips on re-homing your pet below.   [Insert re-homing tips]   Another option is to surrender your pet to a rescue group. Rescues are preferred over shelters, because they often keep their pets in foster homes rather than kennels. A more familiar housing experience can cut down on stress and illness. You can even look into rescues that are breed specific or for senior pets. Please find a list of rescues below.   [Insert rescue list]   I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3030 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.  6/16/20146
HousingLong-term boarding needsLong Term Boarding Needs EmailEmailThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. I am very sorry to hear that you are in such difficult circumstances which have left your future with your pet uncertain. Unfortunately, our foster program is only for kittens and puppies too young to be adopted and the occasional shelter animal who is recovering from illness or injury.   For moving/general life issues: The San Francisco SPCA offers boarding services limited to two weeks per stay. To qualify for our boarding services, your pet must have had a wellness exam at our hospital with the last 6 months to a year, and be current on vaccines. Please call us at 415-554-3030 if you would like to book a reservation.   If you will need to board your pet for over two weeks, your best option would be to find friends or family that would be able to care for your cat while you are away. For instance, you could try getting the word out on Facebook to see if someone is able to care for her/him . If that is not an option, and you will need to board your pet at a facility for an extended amount of time, we recommend contacting a boarding facility. Most boarding facilities are only set up for short-term boarding periods of a few weeks, but it would be worth calling around and checking on prices and policies. I have attached a list of a few boarding facilities in the Bay Area, but I would recommend doing a Google search for cat boarding in case these options do not work out. [Attach referral boarding facilities doc]   For domestic violence: The Humane Society of the United States partners with some California shelters for their Safe Haven program. In San Francisco, that shelter is San Francisco Animal Care and control at 415-554-6364. For a list of all California Safe Haven shelters, please see http://www.humanesociety.org/issues/abuse_neglect/tips/safe_havens_directory.html#   For active duty military/homeless vets: There are several organizations for active duty and veteran service people which may be able to help you find temporary care for your pets. Please contact Guardian Angels for Soldiers’ Pets , Dogs on Deployment , or The Military Pets FOSTER Project for more information on assistance that may be available to you.   I’m sorry that we are unable to offer the foster service you requested, but I am hopeful that this information will be helpful to you. Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further5/8/20150
HousingLong-term boarding needsLong Term boarding needs PhoneEmailHello _____ ,   Thank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. I am very sorry to hear that you are in such difficult circumstances which have left your future with your pet uncertain. Unfortunately, our foster program is only for kittens and puppies too young to be adopted and the occasional shelter animal who is recovering from illness or injury.   For moving/general life issues: The San Francisco SPCA offers boarding services limited to two weeks per stay. To qualify for our boarding services, your pet must have had a wellness exam at our hospital with the last 6 months to a year, and be current on vaccines. Please call us at 415-554-3030 if you would like to book a reservation.   If you will need to board your pet for over two weeks, your best option would be to find friends or family that would be able to care for your cat while you are away. For instance, you could try getting the word out on Facebook to see if someone is able to care for her/him . If that is not an option, and you will need to board your pet at a facility for an extended amount of time, we recommend contacting a boarding facility. Most boarding facilities are only set up for short-term boarding periods of a few weeks, but it would be worth calling around and checking on prices and policies. I have attached a list of a few boarding facilities in the Bay Area, but I would recommend doing a Google search for cat boarding in case these options do not work out. [Attach referral boarding facilities doc]   For domestic violence: The Humane Society of the United States partners with some California shelters for their Safe Haven program. In San Francisco, that shelter is San Francisco Animal Care and control at 415-554-6364. For a list of all California Safe Haven shelters, please see http://www.humanesociety.org/issues/abuse_neglect/tips/safe_havens_directory.html#   For active duty military/homeless vets: There are several organizations for active duty and veteran service people which may be able to help you find temporary care for your pets. Please contact Guardian Angels for Soldiers’ Pets , Dogs on Deployment , or The Military Pets FOSTER Project for more information on assistance that may be available to you.   I’m sorry that we are unable to offer the foster service you requested, but I am hopeful that this information will be helpful to you. Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further6/16/20140
HousingCan't find pet friendly housingHousing, Can't find pet friendly housing emailEmailI am sorry to hear you are facing a housing situation that jeopardizes keeping _____ . We understand that finding pet friendly housing can be fairly stressful. If you are in search of pet friendly housing, but need to place your pet somewhere temporary, we recommend asking around to family and friends to see if they can “foster” _____ until you find a place that will accept pets.     If you are unable to find pet friendly housing, the shelter should still be your very last resort.   The best alternative would be to find a new home for your pet on your own. Placing your pet directly in a new home spares him or her the stress of living in an animal shelter, and leaves a lifesaving space for other pets in need. Please find the tips on re-homing your pet below.   [Insert re-homing tips]   Another option is to surrender your pet to a rescue group. Rescues are preferred over shelters, because they often keep their pets in foster homes rather than kennels. A more familiar housing experience can cut down on stress and illness. You can even look into rescues that are breed specific or for senior pets. Please find a list of rescues below.   [Insert rescue list]   I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3030 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.5/12/20153
HousingCan't afford pet deposit / rentHousing, Can't afford pet deposit / rent emailEmailI am sorry to hear you are facing a housing situation that jeopardizes keeping _____ . We understand that finding pet friendly housing can be fairly stressful. If you are in search of pet friendly housing, but need to place your pet somewhere temporary, we recommend asking around to family and friends to see if they can “foster” _____ until you find a place that will accept pets.     If you are unable to find pet friendly housing, the shelter should still be your very last resort.   The best alternative would be to find a new home for your pet on your own. Placing your pet directly in a new home spares him or her the stress of living in an animal shelter, and leaves a lifesaving space for other pets in need. Please find the tips on re-homing your pet below.   [Insert re-homing tips]   Another option is to surrender your pet to a rescue group. Rescues are preferred over shelters, because they often keep their pets in foster homes rather than kennels. A more familiar housing experience can cut down on stress and illness. You can even look into rescues that are breed specific or for senior pets. Please find a list of rescues below.   [Insert rescue list]   I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3030 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.5/12/20150
Recent Adopt / AcquireAdopt - not a good matchNot a good match EmailEmailI am sorry to hear you are having some uncertainties about your recent adoption of ____ .   I want to reassure you that it is not unusual to feel overwhelmed after a recent adoption! While it is overall a very happy life event, all major life changes entail some stress. We are here to support you through the adjustment process.   If your concerns are related to specific behavior or medical issues, we offer considerable post-adoption training and veterinary support to make sure that our adopters and pets experience a smooth transition into their new lives together. A good place to start is our extensive library of information for both dog and cat owners on our website at http://sfspca.org/resources/library . If you do not find the information you need here, please contact so that we may address your specific concerns.   If you truly feel that you are not ready for a pet, or that the pet you have adopted is not a good fit for your home or lifestyle, we can schedule an appointment for you to bring you pet back to us. If you prefer not to bring your pet back to the shelter, I can also send you information on placing him/her directly in another loving home.   Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.5/8/20156
Recent Adopt / AcquireAdopt - not a good matchNot a good match PhonePhoneDear _____ ,   I am sorry to hear you are having some uncertainties about your recent adoption of ____ .   I want to reassure you that it is not unusual to feel overwhelmed after a recent adoption! While it is overall a very happy life event, all major life changes entail some stress. We are here to support you through the adjustment process.   If your concerns are related to specific behavior or medical issues, we offer considerable post-adoption training and veterinary support to make sure that our adopters and pets experience a smooth transition into their new lives together. A good place to start is our extensive library of information for both dog and cat owners on our website at http://sfspca.org/resources/library . If you do not find the information you need here, please contact so that we may address your specific concerns.   If you truly feel that you are not ready for a pet, or that the pet you have adopted is not a good fit for your home or lifestyle, we can schedule an appointment for you to bring you pet back to us. If you prefer not to bring your pet back to the shelter, I can also send you information on placing him/her directly in another loving home.   Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information. Warmest regards,6/16/201460
Recent Adopt / AcquireGiven to, can't keepGiven to, can't keep EmailEmailHello ____ , Thank you for contacting us about your dog/cat . The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. If you are feeling overwhelmed, or there is a medical or behavior concern, please feel free to contact us to discuss resources we may have that can help you keep your pet.   If you must surrender _____ , we would hope to keep him/her out of the shelter. An animal shelter is an inherently stressful place due to all the unfamiliar sights, sounds, smells, other pets, and people combined with elimination of the pet’s previous routine. Even the most confident, healthy pet typically experiences changes in their behavior and health while in an animal shelter. For this reason, we strongly encourage guardians to find a new home on their own, or try surrendering to a rescue before seeking placement in an animal shelter. [Insert re-homing tips]   Another option is to surrender your pet to a rescue group. Rescues are preferred over shelters, because they often keep their pets in foster homes rather than kennels. A more familiar housing experience can cut down on stress and illness. You can even look into rescues that are breed- specific or for senior pets. Please find a list of rescues below.   [Insert rescue list]   I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3030 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.5/11/20151
Recent Adopt / AcquireGiven to, can't keepGiven toPhoneHello ____ , Thank you for contacting us about your dog/cat . The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. If you are feeling overwhelmed, or there is a medical or behavior concern, please feel free to contact us to discuss resources we may have that can help you keep your pet.   If you must surrender _____ , we would hope to keep him/her out of the shelter. An animal shelter is an inherently stressful place due to all the unfamiliar sights, sounds, smells, other pets, and people combined with elimination of the pet’s previous routine. Even the most confident, healthy pet typically experiences changes in their behavior and health while in an animal shelter. For this reason, we strongly encourage guardians to find a new home on their own, or try surrendering to a rescue before seeking placement in an animal shelter. [Insert re-homing tips]   Another option is to surrender your pet to a rescue group. Rescues are preferred over shelters, because they often keep their pets in foster homes rather than kennels. A more familiar housing experience can cut down on stress and illness. You can even look into rescues that are breed- specific or for senior pets. Please find a list of rescues below.   [Insert rescue list]   I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3030 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.6/16/20147
Recent Adopt / AcquireAdopt - unrealistic expectationsRecent Adopt / Aquire Unrealistic expectations emailEmailI am sorry to hear you are having some uncertainties about your recent adoption of ____ .   I want to reassure you that it is not unusual to feel overwhelmed after a recent adoption! While it is overall a very happy life event, all major life changes entail some stress. We are here to support you through the adjustment process.   If your concerns are related to specific behavior or medical issues, we offer considerable post-adoption training and veterinary support to make sure that our adopters and pets experience a smooth transition into their new lives together. A good place to start is our extensive library of information for both dog and cat owners on our website at http://sfspca.org/resources/library . If you do not find the information you need here, please contact so that we may address your specific concerns.   If you truly feel that you are not ready for a pet, or that the pet you have adopted is not a good fit for your home or lifestyle, we can schedule an appointment for you to bring you pet back to us. If you prefer not to bring your pet back to the shelter, I can also send you information on placing him/her directly in another loving home.   Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further information.5/12/20152
OtherAllergiesOther Allergies PhonePhoneThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. Have you consulted your doctor or pharmacist for advice on your allergies? Many people with allergies live successfully with pets thanks to allergy medication. If that isn’t possible for you, may I send you some information on finding a new home for your pet with friends, family, or members of your community?  Placing your pet directly in a new home spares him or her the stress of living in an animal shelter, and leaves a lifesaving space for other pets in need.   [Document Attachment: Finding a new home for your pet]1/10/20140
OtherRecently adopted - overwhelmedOther Recently adopted - overwhelmed EmailEmailThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. I am happy to happy to help you and your pet through the challenges of adjustment in any way I can. It is not unusual to feel overwhelmed soon after adoption; the increased responsibility, change of routine,  the process of getting to know your pet’s personality and training needs, and establishing rules and new schedules are all adjustments that naturally entail some stress, even though adoption is otherwise such a happy life event. If you’re worried that simply feeling this stress is an indicator that you are not prepared to have a pet in your life, rest assured that this is completely normal! If your concerns are related to specific behavior or medical issues, we offer considerable post-adoption training and veterinary support to make sure that our adopters and pets experience a smooth transition into their new lives together. I would be happy to discuss your specific concerns with you and connect you with the assistance you need. If you truly feel that you are not ready for a pet or that the pet you have adopted is not a good fit for your home or lifestyle, I do understand and will be happy to schedule an appointment for return to the shelter as soon as we have an opening. If you prefer not to bring your pet back to the shelter, I can also send you information on placing him/her directly in another loving home. I hope this helps! Thank you again for getting in touch with us, and please don’t hesitate to contact us at (415) 554-3000 or surrender@sfspca.org if we can offer any further support or information.6/10/20150
OtherRecently adopted - overwhelmedOther Recently adopted - overwhelmed PhonePhoneThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. I want to reassure you that it is not unusual to feel overwhelmed after a recent adoption! While it is overall a very happy life event, all major life changes entail some stress. We are here to support you through the adjustment process. Can you tell me a little more about what your concerns are? “I’m worried that I am not ready for a pet” That is a very natural and common concern after adopting a pet! The increased responsibility, change of routine, the process of getting to know your pet’s personality and training needs, and establishing rules and new schedules are all adjustments that naturally entail some stress, even though adoption is otherwise such a happy life event. If you’re worried that simply feeling this stress is an indicator that you are not prepared to have a pet in your life, rest assured that this is completely normal! If you are experiencing a behavior or medical problem and need help… ( continue with script below ) “My pet has behavior or medical problems” We offer post-adoption training and veterinary support to make sure that our adopters and pets experience a smooth transition into their new lives together. Would you like more information on [ training, financial options, etc.]? “I am truly not ready for a pet/this pet is not a good fit” I completely understand and will be happy to schedule an appointment for return to the shelter as soon as we have an opening. If you prefer not to bring your pet back to the shelter, I can also send you information on placing him/her directly in another loving home.1/10/20140
OtherDog needs more attentionOther Dog Needs More Attention PhonePhoneThank you for contacting us. The mission of the San Francisco SPCA is to keep pets out of shelters by providing resources to help guardians keep their pets or place them directly into new homes. Most people have to leave their pets at home while at work, and there are a number of solutions that enable busy guardians to keep their dogs happy and occupied during time alone. May I send you some information on that?1/29/20140